Czech Republic

NewsNew regulation found after the CAMbrella deliveries:

No new regulation found.


Notice! All text below is copied from the CAMbrella report – delivered Dec 31, 2012

In this summary, you will find:

  • Direct links to the legislation of specific CAM therapies in the Czech Republic
  • The legal and regulatory status of CAM and CAM practices in the Czech Republic
  • The governmental supervision of CAM practices in the Czech Republic
  • The reimbursement status of CAM practices and medicinal products in the Czech Republic
Go directly to legislation of specific CAM therapies in the Czech Republic:
Acupuncture – Anthroposophic medicine – Ayurveda – Chiropractic – Herbal medicine/Phytotherapy –
Homeopathy – Massage – Naprapathy – Naturopathy – Neural therapy – Osteopathy – Traditional Chinese Medicine (TCM) – Other treatments 

The Czech Republic became an independent state in January 1993 and a member of the EU in 2004 (74). The Czech Republic became a member of the Council of Europe in 1993 (12).

The general legal and regulatory status of CAM and CAM practices

There is no general CAM legislation in the Czech Republic, but regulation of acupuncture,
homeopathy, massage, chiropractic and physiotherapy has been established. Information
given by the Ministry of Health in the Czech Republic (75) in September 2011 confirms that acupuncture and homeopathy can only be provided by physicians, and massage,
chiropractic and physiotherapy can only be provided by health professionals according to
specific regulation (see below).

The Czech Republic has from 2004 harmonized its health legislation to the EU Directive
2005/36/EC (5,76). In 2004 two laws were enacted to establish new requirements for
obtaining medical degrees and postgraduate specialized training for physicians and nonphysician health professionals. From 2009 legislation for about 40 postgraduate medical specialties was prepared (76).

The Ministry of Health in the Czech Republic offers a standardized state licensing exam for health professionals like physicians, dentists, nurses, pharmacists and paramedical personnel. Private health care providers must have a state licence and be registered by the regional health authorities to open a private health practice (76).

A NAFKAM representative visited the Czech Republic in October 2010 and was informed
about national discussions in progress of developing CAM legislation in the country.
Acupuncture and homeopathy treatment provided by physicians is regulated through The
Trade Licensing Act (Zivnostenský zákon 455/1991 Sb).

A national act about recognition of qualification of EU citizens (Zákon c. 18/2004 Sb)(77) is probably linked to the Directive 2005/36/EC (5). Our informants think that a legal regime can be facilitated by voluntary selfregulation together with creating new “professions” on the list in the Trade Licencing Act (77). There is no professorial chair for CAM in the Czech Republic (78).

The governmental supervision of CAM Practices

No regulations regarding supervision of CAM practitioners has been found.

The reimbursement status of CAM practices and medicinal products

The Ministry of Health in the Czech Republic confirms in 2011 that acupuncture and
homeopathy are listed in the Act on Public Health Insurance (48/1997) as methods of public health care not covered by insurance (75). We found no reimbursement regulations or insurance coverages for CAM therapies (77).

The reimbursement legislation seems unchanged from 2004. The Ministry of Health in the Czech Republic confirmed in 2004 that according to Act NO. 48/1997 Coll on Public Health Insurance there was no reimbursement of acupuncture and homeopathic remedies (79).

Consequently changes in health regulation from 2004 to 2011 have not influenced the CAM reimbursement coverage.